Red in Tooth and Claw

It's cold where Iive; send mittens

cuartgallery:

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Inuit Art: Skin Deep
Curated by Lisa Truong
May 12 - August 10, 2014
Skin Deep explores the enormous importance of skins and skin clothing in Inuit culture, past and present. In Inuit narratives, skin is something that can be worn, shed, and manipulated. People tattoo their own skin to affirm personal and cultural identities, and wear clothing made from animal skins for aesthetic adornment and protection from the elements. Skin Deep features the tools used to hunt animals and prepare their skins; prints, drawings, and sculptures depicting stories and objects in which skin plays a central role; and objects made from skin, such as mitts and boots. The exhibition includes the work of artists like Ningeokuluk Teevee, Jessie Oonark, Arnaqu Ashevak, and Helen Kalvak.
Image: Jessie Oonark (1906 – 1985), Tattooed Faces (1960). Stonecut on paper, ed. 9/50, Carleton University Art Gallery: Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009. Photo by Patrick Lacasse.

cuartgallery:

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Inuit Art: Skin Deep

Curated by Lisa Truong

May 12 - August 10, 2014

Skin Deep explores the enormous importance of skins and skin clothing in Inuit culture, past and present. In Inuit narratives, skin is something that can be worn, shed, and manipulated. People tattoo their own skin to affirm personal and cultural identities, and wear clothing made from animal skins for aesthetic adornment and protection from the elements. Skin Deep features the tools used to hunt animals and prepare their skins; prints, drawings, and sculptures depicting stories and objects in which skin plays a central role; and objects made from skin, such as mitts and boots. The exhibition includes the work of artists like Ningeokuluk Teevee, Jessie Oonark, Arnaqu Ashevak, and Helen Kalvak.

Image: Jessie Oonark (1906 – 1985), Tattooed Faces (1960). Stonecut on paper, ed. 9/50, Carleton University Art Gallery: Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009. Photo by Patrick Lacasse.

(via terresauvage)

northernbushcraft:

Crossing the Frozen Mackenzie River - One Minute

A managed herd of Reindeer make their way from the foothills towards the Arctic Ocean each spring. This video was shot April 6, 2014 when 3000 reindeer crossed the frozen Mackenzie River between Bar-C & Lucas Point

This video is super cool because reindeer are actually an introduced species, also my supervisor told me that the area is nicknamed reindeer point because of crossings like this (although this group is larger than usual).
adamhillstudios:

I used myself as a model for this one. The #halo was strong enough for a great photo but it also needed a strong foreground element. This was a sunrise over the #HayRiver in the #NWT

adamhillstudios:

I used myself as a model for this one. The #halo was strong enough for a great photo but it also needed a strong foreground element. This was a sunrise over the #HayRiver in the #NWT

adamhillstudios:

#auroraborealis hunting in #ulukhaktok, #nwt

adamhillstudios:

#auroraborealis hunting in #ulukhaktok, #nwt

rhamphotheca:

smithsonianmag:
Photo of the Day:  Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) in the Snow, Denali National Park, Alaska, USA
An Editors’ Pick from our 2012 Photo Contest.
(Photo by Ken Conger, Lanexa, VA)

rhamphotheca:

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the DayCanada lynx (Lynx canadensis) in the Snow, Denali National Park, Alaska, USA

An Editors’ Pick from our 2012 Photo Contest.

(Photo by Ken Conger, Lanexa, VA)

(Source: smithsonianmag, via northernbushcraft)

“There is really no such thing as the ‘voiceless’, there is only the deliberately silenced, or the preferably unheard”

—   

Arundhati Roy (via raygender)

I love this quote and completely agree with it but when I started thinking about my own use of the word “voiceless” I use it to refer to the dead who are, essentially voiceless. Prehistoric archaeology and forensic anthropology do indeed give voices to those who no longer have them.

(Source: autistickanaya, via loveyourchaos)

artgalleryofontario:

Moose Hunters, c. 1859Krieghoff, CorneliusOil on canvasOverall: 30.2 x 42.2 cmGift from the Reuben and Kate Leonard Canadian Fund, 1927© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

artgalleryofontario:

Moose Hunters, c. 1859
Krieghoff, Cornelius
Oil on canvas
Overall: 30.2 x 42.2 cm
Gift from the Reuben and Kate Leonard Canadian Fund, 1927
© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

chrishogarth:

My idea of happiness.

chrishogarth:

My idea of happiness.

(via northernbushcraft)

Apparently the westboro baptist church is going to picket in Alaska

I hope they’re planning to fly direct because good luck getting to Alaska via the Alaska Highway. Canada doesn’t take to kindly to hate groups and border security will surely turn you away. We’ve turned them away before and we’ll do it again I assume. Good riddance.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Chilkat Blanket
woven by Tlingit woman Anisalaga (Mary Ebbetts Hunt)
1823-1919
Fort Rupert, British Colombia
Height: 117 cm. (46 in.)
Materials include mountain goat fiber and cedar bark fiber
Sources:
http://anisalaga.wordpress.com/2013/08/16/introduction/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilkat_weaving

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Chilkat Blanket

woven by Tlingit woman Anisalaga (Mary Ebbetts Hunt)

1823-1919

Fort Rupert, British Colombia

Height: 117 cm. (46 in.)

Materials include mountain goat fiber and cedar bark fiber

Sources:

http://anisalaga.wordpress.com/2013/08/16/introduction/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilkat_weaving

(via oosik)